TDPT 11.3 Against the Canon

We are delighted to announce the publication of Theatre, Dance and Performance Training 11.3, “Against the Canon, guest edited by Mark Evans (Coventry University) and Cass Fleming (Goldsmiths University), with Training Grounds section edited by Sara Reed (Coventry University)

This special issue of Theatre, Dance and Performer Training addresses the forgotten and marginalised contributions made by various collaborative artists and practitioners to the development of performer training during the twentieth and twenty first centuries. 

Many previous publications on training have tended to focus on canonical figures and the dominant historical performer-training narratives. Less attention has been paid to collaboration as an important characteristic of avant-garde performance training, and to the complex exchanges through which pedagogy and work has been developed and disseminated.  This journal issue intentionally centralises these acts of cross-fertilisation and collaborative exchanges, thereby shifting the focus away from canonical individual figures and towards frequently overlooked or under-recognised practitioners and pedagogues. In doing so, we are aware that this special issue is not alone in advocating for such a shift of focus. In many respects we see this issue as one particular marking point in a turn away from a linear, white and patriarchal history of theatre, dance and performance training.

Our contributing authors challenge the manner in which traditional performer training histories often still seek to capture the ‘purity’ of established methods and to identify individual (often white male) owners of successful techniques.  This issue will seek to challenge the ways in which practitioners such as Stanislavsky, Craig, Copeau, Laban, Lecoq, Chekhov and Meisner are often uncritically revered as ‘Master Teachers’ and the ways in which this obscures or negates the existence of wider networks of artists who contributed to the development of these training practices, many of whom were women. To this extent our authors are not looking simply to critique existing canonical figures, but to bring forward the work of those who are usually ignored.

Contents

Editorial

Mark Evans, Cass Fleming & Sara Reed

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Postcard

Graeae

Kirk Bowett

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Article

Something in the atmosphere? Michael Chekhov, Deirdre Hurst Du Prey, and a web of practices between acting and dance

Roanna Mitchell

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Extended conversation

Training theatre students of colour in the United States

Kaja Dunn , Sharrell D. Luckett & Daphnie Sicre

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Postcard

Wac

Danny Sapani

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Article

Training ecologies for the actor-creator and Gordon Craig’s School for the Art of the Theatre

Maiya Murphy

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Extended Conversation

The heuristic pedagogue: navigating myths and truths in pursuit of an equitable approach to voice training

Daron Oram

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Article

If you want to kiss her, kiss her! Gender and queer time in modern Meisner training

Lazlo Pearlman & Deirdre McLaughlin

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Essai

Monika Pagneux

Mark Evans

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Article

Modern movements: women’s contributions to the success of Rudolf Laban’s ideas and practice in England 1930–1941

Michael Huxley & Ramsay Burt

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Essai

A pedagogy for twenty-first century actor training: intracultural theatre practice which embraces pluralistic identity and plays with difference

Kristine Landon-Smith

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Postcard

A view from the archive: the work of Gertrud Falke-Heller and Elsa Gindler

Rebecca Loukes

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Article

Playing outside the frame: revealing the hidden contributions of the women in the French tradition of actor training

Cass Fleming

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Extended Conversation

Against the “Lecoq canon”

Amy Russell

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Postcard

A postcard from Theatre Workshop

As interpreted by Tom Cornford

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Article

Somatic attunement/self-cultivation: Japanese immigration and the performing arts

Barbara Sellers-Young

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Essai

Outside the mainstream: ballet teaching at the margins

Susie Crow

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Manifesto

Undisciplined discipline: performer training for a new generation

Sarah Crews & Denis Cryer-Lennon

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Postcard

YES! Sandra Reeve’s radical practice of acceptance

Alissa Clarke

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